Life expectancy at birth and at age 65 by local areas in the UK, 2006-08 to 2010-12

Life expectancy at birth and at age 65 by local areas in the UK, 2006-08 to 2010-12The Office for National Statistics (ONS) have published male and female period life expectancy at birth and at age 65 for the United Kingdom and local areas within the four constituent countries. Figures are presented for the period 2010–12, with those for the periods 2006–08 to 2009–11 for comparison purposes.

Period life expectancy at a given age for an area is the average number of years a person would live, if he or she experienced the particular area’s age-specific mortality rates for that time period throughout his or her life.

Life expectancy at birth has been used as a measure of the health status of the population of England and Wales since the 1840’s. It was employed in some of the earliest reports of the Registrar General to illustrate the differences in mortality experienced by populations in different parts of the country.

Life expectancy figures are widely used by local health planners in monitoring health inequalities and in targeting resources to tackle these inequalities in the most effective manner. They also help to inform policy, planning and research by the Department of Health and Public Health England, devolved health administrations, local and unitary authorities, and private pensions and insurance companies.

In England, the Department of Health’s Public Health Outcomes Framework (PHOF), sets out its vision for public health, desired outcomes and the indicators that will help in understanding how well public health is being improved and protected. PHOF uses the difference in life expectancy and healthy life expectancy between communities as one of two high level outcomes for monitoring population health.

Key Facts

  • The inequality in life expectancy at birth and at age 65 between the local areas with the highest and lowest figures decreased for males and females between 2000–02 and 2010–12.
  • The majority of local areas in Scotland (72%) were in the fifth of local areas in the UK with the lowest male and female life expectancy at birth in 2010–12. Conversely, only 15% of local areas in England were in this group.
  • In 2010–12, male life expectancy at birth was highest in East Dorset (82.9 years) and lowest in Glasgow City (72.6 years).
  • For females, life expectancy at birth was highest in Purbeck (86.6 years) and lowest in Glasgow City (78.5 years).
  • Approximately 91% of baby boys in East Dorset and 94% of girls in Purbeck will reach their 65th birthday, if 2010–12 mortality rates persist throughout their lifetime. The comparable figures for Glasgow City are 75% for baby boys and 85% for baby girls.
  • Life expectancy at age 65 was highest for men in Harrow, where they could expect to live for a further 20.9 years compared with only 14.9 years for men in Glasgow City.
  • For women at age 65, life expectancy was highest in Camden (23.8 years) and lowest in Glasgow City (18.3 years).

Key Facts – Warwickshire (2010-12)

  • Male life expectancy at birth was 79.8 years, for females it was 83.8 years.
  • Male life expectancy at age 65 was 18.9 years, for females it was 21.7 years.

Key Facts – Warwickshire Districts & Boroughs (2010-12)

  • Male life expectancy at birth varied from 78.2 years in Nuneaton & Bedworth Borough to 81.0 years in Stratford-on-Avon District. Female life expectancy at birth varied from 82.3 years in North Warwickshire Borough to 84.9 years in Stratford-on-Avon District.
  • Male life expectancy at age 65 varied from 17.6 years in Nuneaton & Bedworth Borough to 19.8 years in Stratford-on-Avon District. Female life expectancy at age 65 varied from 20.3 years in Nuneaton & Bedworth Borough to 22.7 years in Warwick.

 

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