Local Alcohol Profiles for England (LAPE): April 2014 update

Local Alcohol Profiles for EnglandThe figures are the latest update to the Local Alcohol Profiles for England (LAPE) data tool and include a new measure of alcohol-related harm. The last update was published in 2012, with the earliest comparable data published in 2006.

  • National figures for alcohol-related mortality for men are down 1.9% since the last update and 7.3% over a 5-year period.
  • For women, alcohol-related mortality figures are down 1.4% since the last update and 6.8% over a 5-year period.

The LAPE tool presents data for 26 alcohol-related indicators in an interactive tool, which helps local areas assess alcohol-related harm and monitor the progress of efforts to reduce this. The data tool also provides links to further supporting and relevant information to aid understanding of alcohol-related harm in a local population.

However, while the overall trend is downward there are still large variations between affluent and deprived areas, with some of the deprived communities seeing an increase in deaths. Of the 326 local authorities included in the data, 145 have seen an increase in alcohol-related deaths among men and 154 among women – compared to the last update in 2012.

Hospital admissions for alcohol-related conditions remain at similar levels with over a million admissions in 2012 to 2013. However, the figures do show a continued decline in the overall numbers of young people, aged under 18, being admitted to hospital as a result of alcohol:

Key Facts

  • hospital admissions caused by alcohol in England for under 18s were down by 13.9% since the last update in 2012 and by 34.4% over the past 5 years.
  • hospital admissions caused by alcohol in Warwickshire for under 18s were down by 14.8% since the last update in 2012 and by 35.4% over the past 5 years.

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