Local Alcohol Profiles for England (LAPE): April 2014 update

Local Alcohol Profiles for EnglandThe figures are the latest update to the Local Alcohol Profiles for England (LAPE) data tool and include a new measure of alcohol-related harm. The last update was published in 2012, with the earliest comparable data published in 2006.

  • National figures for alcohol-related mortality for men are down 1.9% since the last update and 7.3% over a 5-year period.
  • For women, alcohol-related mortality figures are down 1.4% since the last update and 6.8% over a 5-year period.

The LAPE tool presents data for 26 alcohol-related indicators in an interactive tool, which helps local areas assess alcohol-related harm and monitor the progress of efforts to reduce this. The data tool also provides links to further supporting and relevant information to aid understanding of alcohol-related harm in a local population.

However, while the overall trend is downward there are still large variations between affluent and deprived areas, with some of the deprived communities seeing an increase in deaths. Of the 326 local authorities included in the data, 145 have seen an increase in alcohol-related deaths among men and 154 among women – compared to the last update in 2012.

Hospital admissions for alcohol-related conditions remain at similar levels with over a million admissions in 2012 to 2013. However, the figures do show a continued decline in the overall numbers of young people, aged under 18, being admitted to hospital as a result of alcohol:

Key Facts

  • hospital admissions caused by alcohol in England for under 18s were down by 13.9% since the last update in 2012 and by 34.4% over the past 5 years.
  • hospital admissions caused by alcohol in Warwickshire for under 18s were down by 14.8% since the last update in 2012 and by 35.4% over the past 5 years.

Life expectancy at birth and at age 65 by local areas in the UK, 2006-08 to 2010-12

Life expectancy at birth and at age 65 by local areas in the UK, 2006-08 to 2010-12The Office for National Statistics (ONS) have published male and female period life expectancy at birth and at age 65 for the United Kingdom and local areas within the four constituent countries. Figures are presented for the period 2010–12, with those for the periods 2006–08 to 2009–11 for comparison purposes.

Period life expectancy at a given age for an area is the average number of years a person would live, if he or she experienced the particular area’s age-specific mortality rates for that time period throughout his or her life.

Life expectancy at birth has been used as a measure of the health status of the population of England and Wales since the 1840’s. It was employed in some of the earliest reports of the Registrar General to illustrate the differences in mortality experienced by populations in different parts of the country.

Life expectancy figures are widely used by local health planners in monitoring health inequalities and in targeting resources to tackle these inequalities in the most effective manner. They also help to inform policy, planning and research by the Department of Health and Public Health England, devolved health administrations, local and unitary authorities, and private pensions and insurance companies.

In England, the Department of Health’s Public Health Outcomes Framework (PHOF), sets out its vision for public health, desired outcomes and the indicators that will help in understanding how well public health is being improved and protected. PHOF uses the difference in life expectancy and healthy life expectancy between communities as one of two high level outcomes for monitoring population health.

Key Facts

  • The inequality in life expectancy at birth and at age 65 between the local areas with the highest and lowest figures decreased for males and females between 2000–02 and 2010–12.
  • The majority of local areas in Scotland (72%) were in the fifth of local areas in the UK with the lowest male and female life expectancy at birth in 2010–12. Conversely, only 15% of local areas in England were in this group.
  • In 2010–12, male life expectancy at birth was highest in East Dorset (82.9 years) and lowest in Glasgow City (72.6 years).
  • For females, life expectancy at birth was highest in Purbeck (86.6 years) and lowest in Glasgow City (78.5 years).
  • Approximately 91% of baby boys in East Dorset and 94% of girls in Purbeck will reach their 65th birthday, if 2010–12 mortality rates persist throughout their lifetime. The comparable figures for Glasgow City are 75% for baby boys and 85% for baby girls.
  • Life expectancy at age 65 was highest for men in Harrow, where they could expect to live for a further 20.9 years compared with only 14.9 years for men in Glasgow City.
  • For women at age 65, life expectancy was highest in Camden (23.8 years) and lowest in Glasgow City (18.3 years).

Key Facts – Warwickshire (2010-12)

  • Male life expectancy at birth was 79.8 years, for females it was 83.8 years.
  • Male life expectancy at age 65 was 18.9 years, for females it was 21.7 years.

Key Facts – Warwickshire Districts & Boroughs (2010-12)

  • Male life expectancy at birth varied from 78.2 years in Nuneaton & Bedworth Borough to 81.0 years in Stratford-on-Avon District. Female life expectancy at birth varied from 82.3 years in North Warwickshire Borough to 84.9 years in Stratford-on-Avon District.
  • Male life expectancy at age 65 varied from 17.6 years in Nuneaton & Bedworth Borough to 19.8 years in Stratford-on-Avon District. Female life expectancy at age 65 varied from 20.3 years in Nuneaton & Bedworth Borough to 22.7 years in Warwick.

 

Key facts and trends in mental health, 2014 update

Key facts and trends in mental health - 2014 update

The third edition of the Mental Health Network factsheet giving an overview of the major trends and challenges facing mental health services has been released. Compiled from a wide range of sources, this updated factsheet sets out available data reflecting new figures, statistics and resources relating to:

• investment in services
• trends in morbidity
• suicide and homicide rates
• service activity
• use of mental health legislation
• mental health of children and young people
• service user experience
• inequalities experienced by people with mental health problems
• workforce and staff satisfaction

Key Facts

• In 2011/12, investment in mental health services for adults of working age (aged 18–64) dropped by 1 per cent in real terms from the previous year.
• The 2007 adult psychiatric morbidity survey found that the proportion of the English population aged between 16 and 64 meeting the criteria for one common mental disorder increased from 15.5 per cent in 1993 to 17.6 per cent in 2007.
• There were nearly 1.6 million (1,590,332) people in contact with specialist mental health services in 2012/13.
• 105,224 service users (6.6 per cent of all service users) spent time in hospital at some point in the year. This is a small increase from 6.3 per cent of all service users in 2011/12.
• People in contact with NHS funded adult specialist mental health services spent over 8 million (8,133,764) days in hospital in 2012/13 – an increase of just over 515,000 bed days from 7,618,269 in 2011/12.
• In 2012/13, there were 50,408 detentions under the Mental Health Act. This is 4 per cent (1,777) greater than during the 2011/12 reporting period.
• Between one in 12 and one in 15 children and young people are thought to deliberately self-harm.
• There were 3,626 inpatient admissions for child and adolescent psychiatry specialties in 2011/12, compared to 3,136 admissions in the previous year – a 15.6 per cent increase.
• Taking an inclusive definition of a mental health problem, which includes people with alcohol or illicit drug dependencies as well as conditions such as psychosis, about 42 per cent of all cigarettes smoked by the English population are smoked by people
with a mental health problem.
• Around 30 per cent of those suffering from a long-term physical health condition also have a mental health problem.

Longer Lives

PH logoThe Public Health England website ‘Longer Lives’ has been updated. It allows people to easily see local information for the West Midlands on early deaths from major killers like cancer, heart disease, stroke, lung and liver disease and how they vary across the country.

Using a traffic-light rating system, it ranks areas showing those above average in tackling avoidable deaths as green, while those that still have more to do, are red. The website contains a range of data that allows people to easily compare an area’s mortality against those with similar populations, incomes and levels of health. Overall it shows that the north of England has a higher risk of early death than the south, but when comparing areas of a similar socio-economic status, it reveals a more complex picture.

Key Facts – England

  • In 2012, one in three deaths in England was defined as being premature which refers to deaths under the age of 75.

Key Facts – Warwickshire

  • There were 4,563 premature deaths in the three year period 2010-12 which equates to approximately 30% of all deaths.
  • The county ranks 39th out of 150 local authorities for overall premature deaths per 100,000 population for 2010-12.
  • Compared to the national picture Warwickshire is doing well on most mortality indicators other than liver disease where it is ranked 47th.
  • The county ranks 11th out of 15 when compared to similar local authorities for overall premature deaths.

Alcohol-related deaths in the United Kingdom

ONSThe Office for National Statistics (ONS) has released figures for alcohol-related deaths in the UK, its four constituent countries and regions of England, it does not include county level data. Comparisons are made between 2012, the latest year, and previously published data from 2002 onwards.

ONS recently revised mid-2002 to 2010 population estimates in light of the 2011 Census. Death rates relating to this period have therefore been revised and may differ from previously published figures. In the previous release, ‘Alcohol-related deaths in the United Kingdom, 2011’ UK rates were based on a combination of the 2011 Census population estimates for England and Wales and rolled forward mid-year population estimates (from the 2001 Census) for Scotland and Northern Ireland. These rates have now been re-based on 2011 Census populations for each UK constituent country.

Key Facts:

  • In 2012 there were 8,367 alcohol-related deaths in the UK, 381 fewer than in 2011 (8,748).
  • Males accounted for approximately 65% of all alcohol-related deaths in the UK in 2012.
  • Death rates were highest among men aged 60 to 64 years (42.6 deaths per 100,000 population) and women aged 55 to 59 years (22.2 deaths per 100,000).
  • Of the four UK constituent countries, only in Scotland were male and female death rates in 2012 significantly lower than in 2002.
  • In England and Wales, 63% of all alcohol-related deaths in 2012 were caused by alcoholic liver disease, with 16% of these deaths occurring among those aged 55 to 59 years.
  • In England, alcohol-related death rates were highest among regions in the North and lowest among those in the South throughout the period 2002–2012.
  • In the West Midlands, the male alcohol-related death rate was 16.5 per 100,000 population, for females the rate was 8.4 per 100,000 population.

More details from the ONS Statistical Bulletin can be accessed here.

Health Survey for England – 2012

Health Survey for England - 2012The Health Survey for England is a series of annual surveys designed to measure health and health-related behaviours in adults and children living in private households in England. The survey is currently commissioned by the Health and Social Care Information Centre (HSCIC), and before April 2005 was commissioned by the Department of Health. Since 1994, the survey has been carried out by NatCen Social Research and the Research Department of Epidemiology and Public Health at UCL (University College London).

The survey consists of an interview and nurse visit. It has a series of core elements that are included every year or alternate years, and special topics that are included in selected years. The trend tables focus on key changes in core topics and measurements.

Key Facts

Physical activity

  • The proportion of adults who meet recommendations for physical activity in 2012 (66 per cent of men and 54 per cent of women) has remained the roughly same as 2008 with 66 per cent and 55 per cent respectively. The biggest increase in the proportion of men and women in meeting recommendations is in those aged 65 to 74 (from 46 per cent in 2008 to 51 per cent in 2012 for men and 37 per cent to 42 per cent for women for the same period).
  • The proportion of children (aged 5 to 15) who meet recommendations for physical activity in 2008 was 28 per cent for boys and 19 per cent for girls which decreased for both in 2012 to 21 per cent for boys and 16 per cent for girls. Girls aged 11 to 12 was the only group that showed an increase in the proportion meeting recommendations, albeit very slight (13 per cent in 2008 to 14 per cent in 2012).

Blood pressure

  • The prevalence of hypertension in 2012 was 31 per cent among men and 27 per cent among women, remaining at a similar level over the last few years. Between 2003 and 2012, the proportion of the population with controlled hypertension increased from 5 per cent to 9 per cent among men, and from 6 per cent to 9 per cent among women, a slight decrease from 11 per cent and 10 per cent respectively in 2011. The proportion of adults with untreated hypertension decreased from 2003 to 2012 for both sexes (20 per cent to 16 per cent among men and 16 per cent to 11 per cent among women). Whilst the proportion of women with untreated hypertension is about the same as 2011 the proportion of men has risen slightly resulting in a slight increase in the overall figures which had maintained a steady decline since 2003.

Obesity

  • The proportion of adults with a normal Body Mass Index (BMI) decreased between 1993 and 2012, from 41 per cent to 32 per cent among men and from 49 per cent to 41 per cent among women. Among both men and women there has been little change in the proportion that was overweight over the period (42 per cent of men and 32 per cent of women in 2012).
  • Between 1993 and 2012, there has been a marked increase in the proportion of adults that were obese. This increased from 13 per cent of men in 1993 to 24 per cent in 2012 and from 16 per cent of women in 1993 to 25 per cent in 2012. The rate of increase in obesity prevalence has been slower in the second half of the period than the first half, and there are indications that the trend may be flattening out, at least temporarily. However, obesity in both men and women peaked in 2010 and was at its highest level since 1993.

Cigarette smoking

  • Among men there was an increase overall in the proportion who had never regularly smoked cigarettes (from 39 per cent in 1993 to 51 per cent in 2012). Correspondingly, the proportion of men who were current smokers declined overall from 28 per cent in 1993 to 22 per cent in 2012.
  • The proportion of women who had never regularly smoked increased from 52 per cent in 1993 to 61 per cent in 2012, while the proportion of current smokers decreased overall in the same period, falling from 26 per cent to 18 per cent.
  • The proportion of men and women who smoked 20 or more cigarettes per day has fallen: from 11 per cent of men in 1993 to 5 per cent in 2012 and from 8 per cent of women to 3 per cent over the same time period.

Alcohol consumption

  • The proportion of men consuming more than four units on the heaviest day’s drinking in the last week did not show substantial change between 2006 and 2012 (37 per cent in 2012), and similarly the proportion of men that drank more than twice the recommended amount showed little change over the period (21 per cent in 2012).
  • The picture was different among women: there was a decrease between 2006 and 2012 both in the proportion consuming more than three units on the heaviest day’s drinking last week (from 33 per cent to 28 per cent), and in the proportion drinking more than twice the recommended amount (from 16 per cent to 13 per cent). Both these proportions have remained the same for the last two years.

Long standing illness 

  • The prevalence of long standing illness among men increased overall from 40 per cent in 1993 to around 44 per cent between 1997 and 2003, but appears to have decreased gradually over the last few years; it was 35 per cent in 2012. Among women, prevalence increased from 40 per cent in 1993 to 47 per cent in 2004, but has since decreased and was 41 per cent in 2012.

Diabetes

  • The prevalence of doctor-diagnosed diabetes increased between 1994 and 2012 from 2.9 per cent to 6.7 per cent among men and from 1.9 per cent to 4.9 per cent among women.

Putting dementia on the map

Putting dementia on the mapThe Department of Health has published an interactive online map to show people the level of dementia care and support in their local area.

The map is part of the Government’s ‘State of the Nation’ report which has examined the quality of dementia care in England, with a range of data including diagnosis rates, referral rates and how often anti-psychotic drugs are prescribed to patients.

According to official figures, 670,000 people in England live with dementia and this number is set to double in the next 30 years. The report shows that nationally only 48% of people with dementia receive a diagnosis.

At a local level rates are published by Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) with diagnosed rates of 47.3% in Coventry and Rugby CCG, 46.6% in Warwickshire North CCG and 44.1% in South Warwickshire CCG.

The identification and management of dementia is changing with areas including Warwickshire signing up to the Alzheimer’s Society ‘Dementia Friendly Communities’ programme.

A dementia-friendly community is one that shows a high level of public awareness and understanding so that people with dementia and their carer’s are encouraged to seek help and are supported by their community. Such communities are more inclusive of people with dementia, and improve their ability to remain independent and have choice and control over their lives.

Further information about dementia can be obtained from the Coventry and Warwickshire Dementia Portal.