Crime, Recovery and Treatment

It has been suggested that drug users are more likely than non-users to commit criminal offences.

Research studies have found that acquisitive crime such as stealing is commonly linked to offenders of these crime types testing positive for drug use. Treatment for drug using offenders has been measured using a Value For Money (VFM) tool, which demonstrates that crime falls and health improves when people are in drug treatment.

A report has been produced, focusing on drug related criminal activities across Warwickshire for 2012/13. A link to this report can be found below.

Crime, Recovery & Treatment in Warwickshire 2012-13

2012 Migration Patterns in Warwickshire

Migration 2012Last year, we presented some key statistics on migration flows in and out of our five districts (see the last post here).  New data, for 2012, has now been published so we have updated our analysis.

As you might expect, in the course of a year there have not been significant changes in the underlying pattern of population flows.  Warwickshire continues to be a net importer of population from elsewhere in England & Wales, albeit to a lesser extent than previous years.  In 2011/12, 26,000 people moving into Warwickshire.  This was nearly matched with 25,800 residents leaving the county during the same period.  This means we gained around 200 residents over the course of the year, considerably smaller than the 3,800 residents gained in the previous year.

Coventry continues to be the main source of people migrating into the county, with 5,150 making that move during 2011/12, higher than the 3,800 people the previous year.  Around one in five people that move into Warwickshire from elsewhere in England & Wales come from Coventry.  The flow is not one way though, with 2,290 moving from Warwickshire to Coventry over the same period.

As with 2010/11, aside from Coventry, the key migration flows are actually within Warwickshire itself. In 2011/12, 4,110 residents of the county moved from one district to another. This trend is particularly apparent between Warwick and Stratford-on-Avon Districts and North Warwickshire and Nuneaton & Bedworth Boroughs. In 2011/12, nearly 1,600 people moved between the two southern districts, and 950 moved between the two northern boroughs. There is very little movement north to south or vice versa.

Migrarion 2012

For more detailed information, use the interactive tool* provided by the Office for National Statistics or contact the Observatory at research@warwickshire.gov.uk.
* please note that the tool will not work in Internet Explorer 7 or earlier versions.

Little movement in migration figures

Earlier this year, we presented some key statistics on migration flows in and out of our five districts (see the original post here).  New data, for 2011, has now been published so we have updated our analysis.

As you might expect, in the course of a year there have not been significant changes in the underlying pattern of population flows.  Warwickshire continues to be a net importer of population from elsewhere in England & Wales, with 24,350 people moving into the county during 2010/11.  Approximately 20,500 residents left the county for elsewhere during the same period.  This means we gained around 3,800 residents from migratory movements in the course of a year.

Coventry continues to be the main source of people migrating into the county, with 3,800 making that move during 2010/11.  Around one in six people that move into Warwickshire from elsewhere in England & Wales come from Coventry.  The flow is not one way though, with 2,200 moving from Warwickshire to Coventry over the same period.

Aside from Coventry, the key migration flows are actually within Warwickshire itself. As with 2009/10, nearly 4,000 residents of the county moved from one district to another. This trend is particularly apparent between Warwick and Stratford-on-Avon Districts and North Warwickshire and Nuneaton & Bedworth Boroughs. In 2010/11, nearly 1,600 people moved between the two southern districts, and more than 800 moved between the two northern boroughs. There is very little movement north to south or vice versa.

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Quality of Life in Warwickshire 2012/13 Annual Report Published…..

Today Warwickshire Observatory publishes the annual Quality of Life report which provides a detailed look at the people, places and communities in our county. The report is an assessment of the demographic, social, economic and environmental themes that all play a part in influencing our residents’ quality of life.  Some of the issues are easier to influence than others, but the purpose of the report is to provide decision makers with the analysis they need to make more informed choices, and to give all staff in the council a better understanding of the communities that we serve in Warwickshire.

We are always looking at ways to improve the Quality of Life Report and the main innovation this year has been to provide a tool to view and analyse many of the datasets included in the report at a very local level. Throughout the report, you will see the ‘Interactive Map’ icon,  which allows you to examine local data on particular themes through our Instant Atlas tool. This feature also allows downloading of the raw data for each indicator so that you can carry out your own analysis, should you wish to.

This year we have seen some interesting changes, for example where trends may now have reached a turning point and are starting to shift, and where there is little evidence to suggest that inequalities are shrinking.

To find out more please click on the link below to be taken to the report.

2012-13 Quality of Life Report

Any feedback you have can be made through the comments section of our Blog or via Twitter (@WarksObs).

Unemployment falls for the third month in Warwickshire

The Job Seekers’ Allowance (JSA) claimant count in May 2012 was 8,338 in Warwickshire; a rate of 2.5% of the resident working age population and 3.1% of the economically active population. This represents a fall of 246 claimants or 2.9% from the previous month.

Warwickshire’s claimant count has fallen over the past month continuing the downward trend seen in March and April however, this follows significant increases in claimants in January and February 2012.

The broader ILO definition of unemployment for the UK for the three months to April 2012 was 8.2%. The rate was down 0.2 percentage points on the previous quarter.

Unemployment update – May 2012

Student Summer 2012 Placement

An exciting opportunity has arisen for a student to come and work within the Observatory for four to six weeks over the summer (June/July). 

The student will need to be studying in a related discipline (statistics, economics, geography etc.), be highly numerate and willing to work across a range of projects within our team. The main focus for the placement will be working on our high profile ‘Quality of Life in Warwickshire’ report that our team produces annually. In return, the student will gain an insight into working in public sector research and will gain some excellent experience for their CV.

A link to the full details of the placement is below…..

Warwickshire Observatory – Student Placement _Summer 2012_

Coventry and Warwickshire Labour Market Summary

Warwickshire Observatory have just completed the final Labour Market Sumary for 2011/2012.  This is compiled on a quarterly basis and gives headline details on a range of economic data including Job Seekers Allowance (JSA) claimants, vacancies and worklessness. 

The number of JSA claimants was at its highest in August 2011 when 20,141 people were claiming.  In the last quarter the numbers rose in both January and February before falling again in March to 19,464.  The number of notified vacancies has fluctuated throughout the year, reaching their highest in October 2011.  In March the number was just under 7,000.

Nuneaton and Bedworth Borough still has the highest number of claimants per vacancy.  In the last quarter the figure rose in four of the six areas, only falling in Stratford-on-Avon. 

The full summary can be accessed via this link: Labour Market Summary – April 2012