Achieving Social Inclusion Across Warwick District

Achieving Social Inclusion across Warwick District

Earlier this year,  a steering group convened by Warwick District Council commissioned the Observatory to produce an index to assess the scale and distribution of social exclusion in Warwick District. This evidence base will support the District and other partner agencies in reviewing their approach to improving social inclusion.

With the need to understand the geographical spread of social exclusion issues, our analysis focuses on spatial data.  However, there was also a recognised need to understand where specific themes may require more attention than others; therefore, the analysis is based upon producing a model that describes social exclusion at a local level whilst also identifying overarching themes that require district-wide attention.

The 53 indicators used in the index were grouped into the following 7 themes:

  • Isolation
  • Health and Wellbeing
  • Children and Young People
  • Income and Labour Market
  • Housing and Homes
  • Crime and Community Safety
  • Communities of Interest

The map and table below show the top ten areas that are most socially excluded across Warwick District according to this bespoke index.

Index of Social ExclusionLillington East in Crown ward is the most socially excluded area on the index. It is the worst performing area for two of the seven themes (Income and Labour Market and Children and Young People) and features in the top ten for five of the seven indicators. This area exhibits a wide range of exclusion related issues rather than a handful of problems which exist elsewhere.

Map of social exclusionOne of the benefits of producing the index at a very local level is areas are identified that may have been previously masked when looking at data at a higher level.  This is the case for the two Sydenham areas (ranked 3rd and 4th on the index) which sit within Willes ward. Sydenham North is the worst performing area in the District for two themes (Health & Wellbeing and Communities of Interest) and both areas have a diverse population in terms of the proportion of residents born abroad and ethnicity.

Half of the areas in the top 10 are in Brunswick ward. Stoneleigh is the first rural area to feature on the index as the 8th most socially excluded area in the District.

For more of the key messages and to access the report, please click on the link below:

Warwick District Social Exclusion Index Report

Warwick District Social Exclusion Index Appendices

The steering group have created a short project feedback survey for the Social Inclusion Index work.  Please could you spare a few minutes to let us have your feedback on the work and how you plan to use it by clicking on the link below:

Warwick-Social-Exclusion-Banner

Census Profiler Update – Safer Neighbourhood Areas Added

screenshot 2

Due to a number of requests from users, we have made some more adjustments to our excel-based 2011 Census small area profiling tool and added in the geography of Safer Neighbourhood Areas (as well as Children’s Centre areas a few months ago). 

This tool allows you to generate your own 2011 Census profiles bringing together themes such as population, housing, ethnic background, religion, heath, education and employment at a number of different Warwickshire geographies including:

    • ONS geographies: Output Area, Lower Super Output Area (LSOA) and Middle Super Output Area (MSOA)
    • Wards
    • Localities
    • Electoral Divisions
    • Parishes
    • Children’s Centre Areas
    • Safer Neighbourhood Areas
    • District/Boroughs
    • Warwickshire
    • National & West Midlands Region comparators

The updated Census Profiler tool can be accessed using the link below:

2011 Census Small Area Profiler (June 2014)

NB: Please be aware this is a large file so it will take a few minutes to download.

Substance Misuse among Young People in Warwickshire

Front coverA report published by Public Health England was written, focusing on substance misuse among young people in England for 2012/13.  Following a similar structure, a Warwickshire based report has been produced highlighting the key messages around young people who accessed specialist treatment as a result of substance misuse in 2012/13.

Analysis was carried out using data from Compass, Warwickshire. Compass is a national leading provider, delivering services to young people in order to help tackle problem drug and alcohol use. The report includes figures for drug choices among young people in Warwickshire, most popular age, treatment services, referral sources and risky behaviours. A link to this report can be found below:

Substance Misuse among Young People in Warwickshire 2012/13

In the news – Warwickshire’s Quality of Life 2013/14 report

Quality-of-Life-Logo

Following the publication of Warwickshire’s Quality of Life report earlier this week, find out more information on the report by watching the following video:

Also the report featured on BBC Coventry & Warwickshire’s Breakfast Show on Thursday 7th November.  Three of WCC’s Members, Cllr Cockburn, Cllr Tandy and Cllr Gifford also discussed how the report would impact on the political landscape and influence decisions made across the county.

If you want to listen to the breakfast show, it’s available on BBC Coventry & Warwickshire’s website.

(Andy Davis, the Warwickshire Observatory’s manager talks about the report around 5 minutes 40 seconds and WCC’s three elected Members discuss some of the issues raised at around 1 hour 7 minutes)

Alternatively, listen to the below Audioboo which focuses on Andy discussing the report:

 

Quality of Life in Warwickshire 2013/14 report published

Quality of Life

Today the team is publishing our annual Quality of Life in Warwickshire report, which provides a detailed look at the people, places and communities in our county. The report is an assessment of the demographic, social, economic and environmental themes that all play a part in influencing our residents’ quality of life.

The need for this type of material is more important than ever, as increasingly limited resources need to be deployed in transparent, evidence-led ways. The Quality of Life in Warwickshire report continues to provide local decision makers in the public, private, and voluntary sectors with that evidence base so that improving the lives of all of Warwickshire’s residents remains our collective priority.

New in this year’s report is the inclusion of 2011 Census data across a number of the themes, resulting in several new indicators. Our 2011 Census prospectus gives further details of the team’s work in this area.

As in previous reports, we’ve started each section with a ‘data visualisation’, designed to stimulate your interest and make the statistics more engaging. We’ve also continued with the Interactive Maps in this year’s report. This provides users with a tool for viewing and analysing many of the datasets included in the report at a very local level.

To find out more please click on the link below to download the report:

Quality of Life in Warwickshire 2013/14 report (6.8 MB)

Continue reading

2013 Annual Pupil Survey

Report Front Cover

The Warwickshire Observatory have been working with the Business Intelligence (Children’s) Team in the People Group over the last five months on the latest Annual Pupil Survey (APS). Previously known as the Every Child Matters (ECM) Survey, the consultation is open to all schools and Colleges in Warwickshire.

Over 5,500 young people responded to the questionnaire this year, representing 43 different schools and colleges across the county. The questionnaire covers a wide range of issues including pupils’ happiness, safety, physical activity, awareness of different issues and accessing help and information.

A copy of the report summarising the key findings from the survey can be accessed by clicking here.

If you have any questions about the project, or would like any further information, please contact us by e-mailing research@warwickshire.gov.uk.

School Attendance – Essential for Raising Educational Standards

In a guest article from Emma Basden-Smith in the Business Intelligence (Children’s) team, we look at the latest release of data on school attendance levels across the county.

School attendance is essential for raising educational standards, and ensuring pupils maximise their opportunities and fulfil their potential. It is a legal requirement that the attendance of children of compulsory school age who are registered at a maintained school is both regular and punctual. Schools and the local authority have a duty to promote and enforce better school attendance and behaviour, address patterns of unauthorised absence, and support parents and pupils through intervention strategies. In Warwickshire, this is led by the council’s Attendance, Compliance and Enforcement Service (ACE).

Absenteeism1

In Warwickshire, and at a national level, published figures for the 2011/12 academic year indicate there have been decreases in two key measures of absence – the percentage of pupils who are persistent absentees (those who have missed around 15% or more of possible sessions; recently changed by the Government from a threshold of 20% to deal with the recognised impact persistent absenteeism has on learning), and the overall absence rate (incorporating both authorised and unauthorised absence).

Warwickshire’s overall absence rate decreased from 5.6% of possible sessions missed to 4.9%, remaining below the national overall absence figure of 5.1%. Figure 1 illustrates the differences in overall absence by school type.

Continue reading